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Duke the service dog goes to school

Rochester, N.Y. -- Ten year old Madyson Siragusa was diagnosed with diabetes last November.

She has an insulin pump and a monitor to check her blood sugar levels.

But she sometimes doesnt realize when those levels are too high or too low and can become lethargic and even pass out.

Her parents were so worried about Madyson, they raised money to buy her a service dog.

The dog named Duke was trained to respond to Siragusas scent when her levels exceed or dip below normal levels.

Duke reacts by becoming agitated and pawing her to let her know to check her levels.

If it happens at night, the dog will also alert her parents that Madyson needs help.

Keri Siragusa also worries when her daughter goes to school. She intended to send Duke with Madyson, to keep an eye on her.

Trainer Lily Grace owns the National Institute for Diabetic Alert Dog Company in California.

They have provided service dogs to 400 people all over the country.

Grace said Madyson didnt caused her disease or do anything to bring it on.

Grace said it is against the law for a school to deny a child a service dog if they have a medical diagnosis or disease.

But the Rush-Henrietta School District told us it researched this case and found that the dog was not medically necessary.

The district went on to say that the district has nurses and other personnel who can monitor Madysons condition and provide help if needed.

The district also told us that in this case, the childs need for the dog is outweighed by the distraction and disruption the dog would cause to other children.

Madysons mother said she still plans to send Duke with her daughter to school Friday.

If he isnt allowed in, they will call police, file a report, and pursue legal action against the district.

 
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